Of captains and canteens

By Pascal SteinwachsMike Zenari Switch to German for original article

The civil servants' union has a lot of influence and almost always gets its way with its demands. An interview with the General Secretary of the CGFP.

Relations between the civil servants' union and the government had reached a low point in recent months because of the increased privatisation tendencies in the public service. However, the conciliation procedure submitted in January has since been suspended for the time being after numerous CGFP demands were implemented. However, it can be restarted at any time, as CGFP General Secretary Steve Heiliger stressed to us in an interview held at the powerful union's premises on Tuesday last week.

Steve Heiliger started his career as a journalist at the "Luxemburger Wort" before joining the CGFP in 2004, where he was initially responsible for public relations before taking over as CGFP General Secretary at the end of 2016 from Romain Wolff, who in turn became President.

Lëtzebuerger Journal: Whoever opposes the civil servants' union in politics in this country seems to stand little chance. What is your opinion on this?

Steve Heiliger: Is that really the case? The CGFP certainly doesn't want to scare anyone. Rather, we have a mandate and that is to stand up for the interests of public sector workers.

But if you are alluding to the strength of the CGFP, then I can only say that the CGFP is indeed a strong union, made up of 65 affiliates with a total of 32,000 members who have expertise in all areas.

How powerful is the CGFP? In other words, why is your union so feared by most politicians? When the CGFP speaks out in public, it carries more weight than when, a statement by the LCGB.

All I can say is that we have three nationally representative trade unions, two for the private sector, and with the CGFP one in the public sector. As CGFP, we have always proved to be a fair social partner with our demands.

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Of captains and canteens

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